Australians at Woodbrook 1909

Sat. August 7th  1909 

Wicklow Newsletter

Bray Notes

As a result of negotiations between the railway company and Mr. Stanley H. Cochrane J. P., the latter is about to erect a platform on the sea side at the railway line to convenience of persons wishing to attend the cricket matches at Woodbrook. The platform will be put up at a point directly opposite the fine cricket ground. Passengers will proceed from the platform to a sub-way underneath the railway which it is proposed to adapt for the purpose, thence to the cricket ground, about two hundred and fifty yards distant. It is hoped to have the whole work completed by the time the Woodbrook team meet – and we trust defeat – the Australians.

Sat. August 28th                   

Mr. S.H. Cochrane  J. P. has lost no time in commencing to erect the siding for the convenience of those strangers who may wish to visit the fine cricket ground at Woodbrook. The work is now in full swing, and should no difficulty arise, the siding should be ready for the great cricket match, Woodbrook versus Australia next month.

Sat. September 18th

Australians visit Bray, and commence their first match against Mr. S. H. Cochrane’s X1

At Woodbrook yesterday, the Australians, who arrived in town the previous evening, commenced their three days match, having as their opponents Mr. Stanley H. Cochrane’s well known and capable eleven. The weather was ideal, from a spectator’s point of view. The sun shone brilliantly the whole afternoon, and the breeze was just sufficient to temper the heat, to that the large number of persons – not many short of 4000 – who were present to witness the fixture, had nothing to complain of regarding the weather. Neither did the play prove uninteresting. It was well sustained throughout, the Australians giving an excellent exhibition of first class cricket.

Most elaborate arrangements for the convenience of visitors and the press had been made. The erection of a platform close to the grounds, where well filled trains from Dublin stopped and detrained their passengers, must have been a great boon to many who had hitherto been deterred from visiting Mr. Cochrane’s ground, owing to their having to make the long journey from Bray on foot or paying the cabmen an excessive fare for a vehicle. Spacious stand accommodation had been provided, and the press were given ample accommodation, instead of, as heretofore, being put into the smallest of tents. Luncheons and teas were provided, the catering being done – and well done – by Mr. O’Dell, of the Royal Hotel.
Play commenced at 12 o’clock. The Australian captain, having won the toss, elected to put his men in first. MacAlister and Bardsley were the first to go to the wickets, and they had to face the bowling of Buckenham and Barnes. During the first few overs runs came somewhat slowly, for the excellent fielding of the home team made run getting extremely difficult. Bardsley drove the ball to the pavilion three times, and MacAlister made a splendid cut to the boundary. After making a double and a single, the latter was missed by Buckenham, the failure costing the home team 28 runs. There followed some uneventful play, and at fifty minutes from the start the score only reached 46. It was then that a change of bowlers was made, Buckenham’s place at the lower wicket being taken by Barnes, and the latter’s place at the pavilion end being taken by Smith. For some time it seemed the whole result of this change was the acceleration of the speed of run getting, for numerous hits from both players sent the ball to the boundary, and the score went rapidly up. After some thirty minutes of this play, and when the score had reached 89, both bowlers were relieved, Barnes giving place to Hayes and Smith to Tanant. A few more singles followed, and then Macalister was caught by Tanant, from a ball delivered by Hayes. The score at that time stood at 95, to which Macalister had contributed 35. Hartigan succeeded Macalister at the wickets, but only received two deliveries, when he was run out in a most unexpected manner, just as the lunch bell rang. At lunch, therefore, the score stood-

 

 

P. A. MacAlister ct. Tanant b. Hayes 35
W. Bardsley not out 0
R. J. Hartigan run out 0
Extras 10
Total 95 for 2 wks.

Score at end of day – Australians all out for       271

 

Sat. September 25th

Australians at Bray

Despite the fact that play in the big match at Woodbrook was timed to start on Saturday at an earlier hour, than on the previous day, a capital crowd had assembled on the ground long before the start.  This was only what might have been expected, for everything was in favour of the proceedings.  Nothing could have been more delightful than the weather. An additional inducement was that the day was a half-holiday. Indeed the majority took the whole day off.

When stumps were drawn on Friday evening it will be recollected that in reply to the Australians’ First Innings of 271 Woodbrook had lost Baker’s wicket for 7 runs.  On Saturday morning Winyard was accompanied to the wickets by Stedman, and the pair were set to face the bowling of O’Connor and Cotter.  O’Connor soon met with success, as he dismissed Stedman with a beautiful delivery at 16, the outgoing batsman having made 7. The Hampshire amateur was then partnered by Hobbs, and play brightened up in great style. The newcomer at once adopted delightful tactics, and with his captain following his example, the crowd was given capital value. Hobbs opened his shoulders without delay, and, despite the efforts of his partner, soon overhauled his score. Cotter had to leave the field, having apparently strained himself, and Carter came out to field, while Armstrong went on to bowl. 50 appeared on the board when the innings was seventy minutes old, and so freely did the batsmen score that when 95 had been reached Whitty came on for Armstrong.  Hobbs  had been doing most of the damage, and

reached his fifty amidst applause. Playing beautiful cricket, the Surrey man, with a late cut off Hopkins, who had also come to bowl, sent up the hundred after the innings had lasted slightly less than two hours. The attack was being subjected to severe treatment, and Noble went on for Hopkins. With 8 runs added the third wicket fell, Hobbs being got rid of. Hayes came in and stopped with Wynyard till lunch, when the score was 118 for 3.

Whitty and Noble were the bowlers after lunch, and after the first mentioned narrowly escaped hitting Wynyard’s stumps with his fourth ball, his fifth brought about the home captain’s dismissal, Noble catching him at point at the second attempt. This was at 116. Wynyard had been at the wicket two hours and twenty five minutes for 36, and his was a sound and valuable innings. Hayes then had Quaife as a partner. Hayes was cautions for a while, but presently let out at Whitty, sending him for two fours in succession. He then had a very narrow escape from being run out. He started to run a short one but Quaife did not stir, and had the ball been returned promptly he might have gone. Whitty and Noble had been bowling for a long period, and at 3.15 O’Connor came on at the pavilion end. Hayes lifted Whitty out of the ground. O’Connor got Hayes leg before at 183, the outgoing batsman having played good cricket for 41. He hit seven fours. Smith was meanwhile playing himself in, and Tanant joined him. The score was taken to 199 when Hopkins went on to bowl for Whitty, and Smith with a leg boundary caused the second century to appear after the innings had lasted three hours and a half. Noble then exercised his right in demanding a new ball. Tanant was in capital form, sending Hopkins to the boundary twice in one over. At 225 Smith was caught in the slips for an excellent 39. Smith and Tanant had put on 42 runs for the seventh wicket. The appearance of Vogler was treated with exceptional interest, he being the best known of the Australians’ opponents on the present occasion, his brilliant work for Woodbrook during the season leading the crowd to anticipate something good from the South African, who was only allowed to play in the present match on the condition that he did not bowl. This was presumably owing to the fact that Vogler will probably form one of the South African team when the Australians visit that colony. He was sent in rather late in the innings, but he had sufficient time to give a glimpse of his form. At 243 Vogler was bowled, the first ball from Whitty after the interval getting in on his stumps. Tanant and Buckenham played bright cricket, and amidst great enthusiasm the Australians’ total was passed at five o’clock. Tarant hit merrily, lost Buckenham at 278. Barnes put on 18 runs for the last wicket; Tanant being last to go, caught off Armstrong  for a sterling innings of 52.

Monday

The match entered on its final stages on Monday, and many surprises were in store for the 4000 persons who watched the game. One of the surprises were the small number of runs made by the Australians in their innings, and another was the failure of Mr. Cochrane’s X1 to bring off a win, as they ought to have done. However, the result was a moral victory for Mr. Cochrane’s very excellent team. They came to within 6 runs of victory, and were only prevented from attaining it by the call of time.

Barnes opened the bowling to Whitty, and had a single scored off his third ball. Buckenham bowled from the other end, and a single was scored off the over. Both bowlers were keeping a good length, and with the batsmen playing cautiously, runs came at a very slow rate. O’Connor at last drove Barnes to the pavilion rails for four, and then facing Buckenham, got that bowler away for a four and a two in the same over. This brought 20 on the board after play had been in progress thirty minutes. A change in the bowling was now tried, Tanant going on for Buckenham. The new bowler met with immediate success, getting Whitty lbw on his second ball. The outgoing batsman had made 10 out of the 24. MacAlister filled the vacancy, and got a four to the stand side off Tanant’s fourth ball. The rate of run getting had now increased, O’Connor getting several nice drives. MacAlister sent one up dangerously near Vogler in the slips, but the South African failed to reach the ball, and a single resulted. A separation, however, was not long delayed, as O’Connor, after getting Tanant away for two successive boundaries, miss hit the next ball, and Hobbs at cover point had no difficulty in bringing off a catch. O’Connor had made 34, a feature in his innings being that his last six hits were fours. The second wicket had fallen at 50. Bardsley was next in, and the scoring again slowed down. Only 12 runs had been added when a magnificent catch by Tanant dismissed MacAlister. The batsman played a ball hard in the slips from Buckenham, who had just previously gone on at the pavilion end viz. Barnes, and Tanant dashing forward, took the ball almost off the ground. With Hartigan in, the scoring continued slow. Barnes went on at the far end for Tanant, and soon met with success, as with the score only increased by 7, the newcomer was held by Stedman, he having made 5. Ransford was next in, and on returning the second ball he received to Barnes which the latter accepted, half the side were out for 69, and the Australian were certainly in a non enviable position, as they were now but 44 on.. Armstrong, who took Ransford’s place, had a narrow shave. The second ball he received from Barnes went straight into the hands of Hobbs at long stop. Hobbs, however failed to hold it. Shortly afterwards Tanant and Buckenham changed places, and the latter with his second ball disposed of  Bardsley, who had made 14 runs. 6 wickets were now down for 95 runs, and in that position the game stood at lunchtime.

On resuming Armstrong was accompanied to the wicket by his captain, Buckenham and Barnes having the attack. Noble sent up the 100 after two hours and a quarter. With the score at 177, the latter was run out in rather sensational fashion. Armstrong played one of Buckenham’s deliveries gently, and both batsmen immediately commenced to run. Buckenham, following up his delivery, just managed to get the ball, which beat the Australian captain by a small margin. Hopkins was next in. Armstrong, when 21, gave a difficult chance to Stedman, standing far back, off Buckenham, who now went off in favour of Tanant. A few runs later Armstrong survived an appeal for lbw from Barnes. In Tarant’s second over Hopkins was smartly stumped by Stedman, and failed by one to reach double figures. Carter now came in for the ninth wicket, but the first ball he received he sent up to Smith at mid off. Carkeek followed for the final wicket, which fell in the second next ball, Stedmond stumping Armstrong , who had been at the wicket  fourteen minutes for his runs. The innings lasted two hours and forty minutes. Tanant had the final analysis of 5 for 40, the last three for no runs and just missing the “hat trick” by one ball.

Set the task of obtaining 105 runs, the home eleven began their task at half past three with Baker and Hobbs, to Whitty and Armstrong. In the latter’s first over Baker was lbw, having failed to score, the total being one. Hayes filled the vacancy, Hobbs sending Whitty to the boundary in the second ball of his next over, and in the following put him out of the ground. With the score taken to 22, Ransford disposed of Hobbs with a brilliant left-handed catch close to the pavilion rails off Armstrong, the Surrey man’s score being 19. Tanant now joined Hayes, sending the second ball he got to the leg boundary. At the tea interval the score had reached 42. At a hour’s batting 50 was hoisted, and then O’Connor took the ball from Whitty, and in the over a misunderstanding between the batsmen resulted in Hayes being run out. Smith was next to come, the game being very slow to watch at this period, when only three quarters of an hour remained to obtain 51 runs. From this on every run was warmly applauded. At 70 O’Connor gave way to Noble. In attempting a third run off Noble, Tanant was magnificently thrown  out by Hartigan from just beside the leg boundary. A slight injury to Carkeek here caused a stoppage of a couple of minutes, just as Vogler came in. At this time the sun was casting a nasty glare over the pitch, and the batsmen were performing under difficulties for quarter of an hour. A hard shot to square leg off Armstrong struck the umpire, three of the necessary runs being thus lost. With ten minutes left, 16 runs were required, and the excitement was intense. With one more obtained, Armstrong dismissed Vogler, who was followed by Quaife, who left next ball, held by Noble in the slips, and Buckenham took his place. A great cheer went up as he put Noble to the boundary, and on the next door scored a single. With the end come at a quarter to six, and the home eleven had failed in their task by 6 runs, the match ending in an exciting draw. Armstrong got his 4 wickets at the cost of only 33 runs.

Scores:-

Australians’ First Innings

 

 

Second Innings

 

P. A. MacAlister ct. Tanant b. Hayes

35

 

ct. Tanant b. Buckenham

12

W. Bardsley not out

143

 

b. Buckenham

14

R. J. Hartigan run out

0

 

ct. Stedmond b. Barnes

5

V. Ransford ct. Hayes b. Barnes

5

 

ct. & b. Barnes

0

W. W. Armstrong b. Barnes

17

 

st. Stedmond b. Tanant

24

M. A. Noble (Captain) ct. Stedmond b. Barnes

11

 

run out

7

A. J. Hopkins ct. Vogler b. Quaife

1

 

st. Stedmond b. Tanant

9

A. Cotter ct. Buckenham b. Quaife

15

 

ct. Smith b. Tanant

0

J. A. O’Connor ct. Smith b. Quaife

2

 

ct. Hobbs b. Tanant

34

W. Carkeek ct. Tanant b. Barnes

5

 

not out

0

W. J. Whitty ct. Vogler b. Quaife

12

 

lbw. b. Tanant

10

Extras

25

 

Extras

14

Total

271

 

Total

129

 

 

 
Fall of wks.95, 95, 113, 177, 207, 208, 225, 243, 271. Fall of Wks. 24, 50, 62, 69, 95, 117, 129, 129, 129.

Mr. Cochrane’s X1 First Innings

 

 

Second Innings

 

E. G. Wynyard (Captain) ct. Noble b. Whitty

36

 

lbw. B. Armstrong

0

Baker b. Cotter

0

   

Stedmond b. O’Connor

7

 

 
Hobbs st. Carkeek b. Noble

56

  ct. Ransford b. Armstrong

19

Hayes lbw. B. O’Connor

41

  run out

15

W. G. Quaife ct. Armstrong b. Whitty

19

  ct. Noble b. Armstrong

0

S. G. Smith ct. Armstrong b. Hopkins

39

  not out

23

Tanant c. Noble b. Armstrong

39

  run out

28

Vogler b. Whitty

6

  b. Armstrong

3

Buckenham ct. Ransford b. Armstrong

17

  not out

5

Barnes not out

6

   

Extras

30

  Extras

1

Total

296

  Total for 6 wks.

99

Fall of wks. 0, 16, 108, 116, 143, 183, 225, 243, 278, 296. Fall of wks. 1, 22, 55, 78, 91, 92